Stating an attribute of a subject noun


One of the three sentence types in Japanese is to state an attribute (adjective) of a subject. (The other two involve a second noun or a verb.)

The subject is marked by an appended が. If the subject is known from context, the subject is left unspoken. The attributive word does not require anything be appended to it.

If the subject is known from context, the subject is left unspoken. This is similar to English, where a known subject is replaced by a pronoun (such as “he” or “they”).

Pattern: ⓃounがⒶadjective

ご注文はうさぎですか? » Volume 1 » Page 81

After Chino’s attempts to grow faster fail, Rize offers to help her present herself more by speaking louder. This is difficult for soft-spoken Chino.

リゼ:
(こえ)(ちい)さい!」
“Your voice is too soft!”

Rize criticizes Chino’s (こえ) (voice) as being (ちい)さい (small, low).

Pattern: Ⓐdjective

ふらいんぐうぃっち » Volume 1 » Page 5

Upon arriving in town, Makoto is surprised to find there is still snow piled up in April. Excited, she places her hands into a mound of snow.

真琴(まこと)
(つめ)たい!!」
“It’s cold!”

There’s no need to speak the subject, that which is cold. Aside from it being rather obvious, she talked about the snow in the prior two panels. The snow she’s placed her hands into is what has the attribute of freezing cold.